Saturday, September 20, 2014

Some Light Refinishing

I love antique wooden furniture, but I don't want the wood itself to show its age and wear.  I'm always on the hunt for ways to revitalize the finish.

In Little Rock I tried was Miss Mustard Seed's Hemp Oil ($13 for 250 ml). I used it on the 1880s kitchen table...


... and our previous dining set...


I even used it as the sealer when I painted the buffet with milk paint.
I really liked how easy it was to use (just wipe on with a rag) and that it's a natural, food-safe oil.

Lately, I've acquired some pieces that require more intensive refinishing.  I tried Restor-A-Finish (in "golden oak"; about $9 for 16 oz.) on the hoosier cabinet...


...one of the side tables in the den...


...the vanity in the upstairs guest bathroom where water had worn away the finish...


...the antique buffet in the den (which had a lot of scratches after a cross-country move)...


...and even the interior of the front door because 30 years of families, children, and dog paws have taken a toll on the finish...


I think Restor-A-Finish works great on pieces that need a little stain and a little shine.  It does a great job removing water rings and can be used on wood with an existing finish (like the bathroom vanity did- I applied it all over, even though water had only worn away the finish in a few areas).  This product is simply wiped on.

I was hesitant to try Restor-A-Finish on my precious 1880s kitchen table because it's tiger oak, but a year after the hemp oil application, it needed something.  It was looking pretty dry-looking (I don't think it has ever had any varnish or anything)...


  I asked the owner of Greenbriar Antiques what he would do because he refinishes a lot of furniture.  He recommended this product ($18 for 16 oz):


I had never used anything quite like it; it's not something just applied and left on the furniture.  It also is not a liquid: it looks like Noxzema or Albolene.  I used a Viva paper towel to rub it onto the table following the grain.


After 5 minutes, I wiped off the excess with an old T-shirt.


It removed a layer of grime and restored some natural-looking shine.


Now it looks ready for the next 130 years...


I'm trying to find some Amish Secret to clean our wood furniture. Anyone have any experience with it or something else you like to use to clean/polish wood pieces?

Happy Saturday!
...

No, I was not paid by any of these brands to say I like their products.

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